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Galveston Historical Foundation

Postmodern Icons of Galveston’s Mardi Gras

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2021, 2 PM

PLEASE NOTE: DUE TO THE SEVERE WEATHER AND LACK OF POWER AFFECTING THE REGION, THIS PRESENTATION HAS BEEN MOVED TO WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2 AT 2 PM.

Preservationists are now beginning to acknowledge and document postmodern icons of the late 20th century. Just as in previous efforts to preserve the past, postmodernism is both misunderstood and sometimes overlooked, and unknowingly demolished. Galveston’s premier expression of postmodernism occurred in the Strand Mechanic Historic District as a nod to the exuberance of Mardi Gras with a backdrop of our rich Victorian architecture. In 1986, developers J.R. McConnell and George Mitchell funded 8 arches designed by prominent architects working in an active international postmodern movement. These temporary architectural masterpieces became what architectural historian Kathryn O’Rourke would call “perhaps the most spectacular collection of postmodern architecture in the United States.”

Join Dr. O’Rourke, associate professor of art history at Trinity University, and GHF Executive Director Dwayne Jones for a conversation and presentation on the important role postmodern design played in reviving an island tradition.

GalvestonHistory+This presentation is available exclusively to GHF members through their GalvestonHistory+ login. Join Galveston Historical Foundation today and enjoy exclusive monthly presentations, member’s only newsletter, automatic 10% discounts on online and in-store purchases, advance access to event tickets, and more. Join us today for access!

ABOUT GALVESTON HISTORICAL FOUNDATION

Galveston Historical Foundation (GHF) was formed as the Galveston Historical Society in 1871 and merged with a new organization formed in 1954 as a non-profit entity devoted to historic preservation and history in Galveston County. Over the last sixty years, GHF has expanded its mission to encompass community redevelopment, historic preservation advocacy, maritime preservation, coastal resiliency and stewardship of historic properties. GHF embraces a broader vision of history and architecture that encompasses advancements in environmental and natural sciences and their intersection with historic buildings and coastal life and conceives of history as an engaging story of individual lives and experiences on Galveston Island from the 19th century to the present day.

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